Sunday, February 19, 2017

Why Experts Now Think You Should Eat More Fat


For more than half a century, the conventional wisdom among nutritionists and public health officials was that fat is dietary enemy number one – the leading cause of obesity and heart disease.

It appears the wisdom was off. And not just off. Almost entirely backward.

According to a new study from the National Institutes of Health, a diet that reduces carbohydrates in favor of fat – including the saturated fat in meat and butter – improves nearly every health measurement, from reducing our waistlines to keeping our arteries clear, more than the low-fat diets that have been recommended for generations. "The medical establishment got it wrong," says cardiologist Dennis Goodman, director of Integrative Medicine at New York Medical Associates. "The belief system didn't pan out."



Thursday, February 16, 2017

12 Most Mind-Blowing Mental Delusions and Syndromes

Delusions come in all shapes and sizes; from transient episodes to full-blown and incurable mental illnesses.

But they all have one thing in common: being detached from reality. Delusions do not listen to reason and they do not bow to facts.

Click to read

Saturday, December 10, 2016

How the Most Emotionally Intelligent CEOs Handle Their Power

Most of the CEOs I've met and worked with had years to prepare for their jobs. As they entered middle management, most of them learned that being a good leader is more important than being a good do-er. Many have stories to tell about stumbling along the way, about micromanaging people, about destroying a team's morale with unreasonable demands, about losing a great team member because enough time and attention weren't given to the relationship.

Most survived these types of difficult experiences and, more important, learned from them. They learned to let go of control and instead support people in doing their jobs. They learned to watch their teams for signs of burnout and rebellion. They learned to help people work smarter, not harder. They learned to read people well. They got very good at recognizing who needs appreciation, who needs support, who's motivated by achievement, and who needs very collegial relationships — even with the boss. They learned tricks for building stronger teams, for dealing with conflict, and for negotiating.

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Male depression: Understanding the issues


Male depression is a serious medical condition, but many men try to ignore it or refuse treatment. Learn the signs and symptoms — and what to do.


Do you feel irritable, isolated or withdrawn? Do you find yourself working all the time? Drinking too much? These unhealthy coping strategies may be clues that you have male depression.


Depression can affect men and women differently. When depression occurs in men, it may be masked by unhealthy coping behavior. For a number of reasons, male depression often goes undiagnosed and can have devastating consequences when it goes untreated. But male depression usually gets better with treatment.


Male depression signs and symptoms


Depression signs and symptoms can differ in men and women. Men also tend to use different coping skills — both healthy and unhealthy — than women do. It isn't clear why men and women may experience depression differently. It likely involves a number of factors, including brain chemistry, hormones and life experiences.


Click to read

            

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

10 Telling Signs You’re an Emotionally Intelligent Person


Emotionally intelligent people are the advice-givers among their group of friends. Do you have a friend who seems to know what you're feeling before you've verbalized it? This friend is emotionally intelligent. There are many of those people in the world. They are the healers, the untrained therapists among friends.

"Oh, ask Stacy. She always knows what to do." Stacy is emotionally intelligent. That's why she knows what your boyfriend is thinking having never had more than a five-minute conversation with the dude.



Saturday, October 24, 2015

Shifting from Star Performer to Star Manager

You've always been a high achiever—top of your class, captain of your sports teams, star performer at work. Now, you're going to be managing a team of high-performers in a division of your company that everyone's buzzing about. You're confident that you can navigate this new challenge with characteristic success.

You're pumped. You set clear goals for yourself and targets for the division. You're well aware that you'll need to rely on your emotional intelligence skills to understand and work through your new team's dynamics. You're focused on achieving your goals and getting results… but before long, you've got problems. Your team doesn't seem to be on board with your plan and they're not delivering. Worse, they seem to be shutting you out. In desperation, you go to a few trusted mentors who tell you:

"You've inherited the cream of the crop. I'm not sure they even really need a manager, they're that good and that motivated."

"These are our stars. You noticed, I'm sure, that you're the third new manager appointed in the past two years?"

Click to read




Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Gene Signature Could be Used to Predict Alzheimer’s Onset Years in Advance [feedly]

A 'gene signature' that could be used to predict the onset of diseases, such as Alzheimer's, years in advance has been developed in research published in the open access journal Genome Biology.

The study aimed to define a set of genes associated with 'healthy ageing' in 65 year olds. Such a molecular profile could be useful for distinguishing people at earlier risk of age-related diseases. This could improve upon the use of chronological age and complement traditional indicators of disease, such as blood pressure.

Lead author James Timmons, from King's College London, UK, said: "We use birth year, or chronological age, to judge everything from insurance premiums to whether you get a medical procedure or not. Most people accept that all 60 year olds are not the same, but there has been no reliable test for underlying 'biological age'.


http://neurosciencenews.com/alzheimers-gene-signature-aging-2583/